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Story by Gordon Grearson - The Oregon Herald
Published on Friday May 28, 2021 - 1:21 AM
 
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PORTLAND, Oregon - Oregon Health Authority is issuing a public health advisory today for unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach in Lincoln County. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children, elderly and those with a compromised immune system should use extra caution as they are more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Levels of fecal bacteria tend to be higher in these types of water sources.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources including:

Stormwater runoff.
Sewer overflows.
Failing septic systems.
Animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.
Even if there is no advisory in effect, avoid swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Ocean waters will be re-tested after an advisory is issued. Once bacteria levels are at a safe level, OHA will notify the public that the advisory is lifted.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, state officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

The D River is a river in Lincoln City, Oregon, United States. The once-nameless river was at one time the 'shortest river in the world' in the Guinness World Records at 440 feet .

The world's shortest title was lost in 1989 when Guinness named the Roe River in Montana as the world's shortest. Attempting to reclaim the title, the people of Lincoln City submitted a new measurement to Guinness of about 120 feet marked at 'extreme high tide'. At that time, Lincoln City's Chamber of Commerce described the Roe as a 'drainage ditch surveyed for a school project'. Montana supporters shot back that D river was merely an 'ocean water backup,' pointed out that there was an alternative fork to the Roe which was only 30 feet long, and suggested that a new survey be conducted. Guinness apparently never ruled on the dispute, leaving the claim by the Roe to stand, but instead, starting in 2006, chose to no longer list a shortest river, possibly as a result of this ongoing dispute. Geography

The D river flows from Devils Lake, under U.S. Route 101, and into the Pacific Ocean, entirely within the city limits of Lincoln City. The D River State Recreation Site off Highway 101 is home to two of the world's largest kite festivals in the summer and fall.

This area was originally settled as the town of Delake, which was later incorporated with other nearby towns to form Lincoln City in 1965. The river had been known by several names, including simply 'the outlet', and earned its short name in a contest.

Lincoln City was originally three cities now combined, incorporated on March 3, 1965, uniting the cities of Delake, Oceanlake and Taft, and the unincorporated communities of Cutler City and Nelscott. These were adjacent communities along U.S. Route 101, which serves as Lincoln City's main street. The name 'Lincoln Cit'y was chosen from contest entries submitted by local school children. The contest was held when it was determined that using one of the five communities' names would be too controversial. D River resided in the city of Oceanlake, now part of 'Lincoln Cit'y.