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Building case in 2014 Nevada standoff is complex
by Dora Pope | examinergazette.com
  Sunday February 28, 2016 - 1:16 PM
 

Cliven Bundy was denied bail on Tuesday at United States of America district court in Portland, Oregon, where he is being held in connection with a 2014 standoff between armed militia and federal officers at his ranch in Nevada.

The indictment released on Wednesday saidCliven Bundy was the leader of the movement to extort the federal government into returning his cattle. In addition, the indictment also alleges five counts of criminal forfeiture that, upon conviction, would require Bundy to forfeit property derived from the proceeds of the crimes totaling at least $3 million, as well as the firearms and ammunition possessed on April 12, 2014, DOJ said.

In his April 2014 confrontation with federal authorities, "Bundy organized and led over 400 followers to assault BLM officers as they guarded the impoundment site, all for the objective of getting cattle back", prosecutors said.

"The rule of law has been reaffirmed with these charges", wrote U.S. Attorney for Nevada Daniel Bogden.

Other than Cliven Bundy, all those charged in the Nevada standoff Wednesday also face charges in the OR standoff.

The indictment of Bundy, 69, his sons Ammon and Ryan and two other men, Ryan Payne and Peter Santilli, in the Nevada standoff comes three weeks after the collapse of another armed protest over federal land management in OR led by the Bundy sons. Bundy does not vaccinate or adequately feed the cows and doesn't know where all of them are, the document says.

"Today marks a tremendous step toward ending more than 20 years of law breaking", said Neil Kornze, director of the Bureau of Land Management.

The cattle were left out during harsh winters, according to the Justice Department memo, their lives coming down to "fighting off predators and scrounging for the meager amounts of food and water available in the hard and arid terrain that comprises the public lands" in the Nevada desert.

He came to OR to support a weeklong occupation at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, which his sons, Ammon and Ryan Bundy, launched January 2 to demand the federal government turn over public lands to local control. Cliven should have stayed in his Nevada ranch and the federal government would have no doubt allowed the geriatric "rebel" to continue to steal land and money from the federal government.

"It's what we anticipated," said Ammon Bundy's lawyer, Mike Arnold.

After that, Bundy was rarely seen in public without a coterie of armed guards, according to the federal complaint, making apprehending him a risky prospect. "That's what courts and trials are for".

The others allegedly organized and recruited followers and acted as leaders in the incident.

In the post, Cliven Bundy "suggests" that Harney County ranchers Steven and Dwight Hammond, who are now in jail for setting two fires on the public land where they grazed their cattle, seek protective custody in county jail as a way to avoid serving their federal sentences.

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