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September 17 2019
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Monday October 27, 2014    09:52 AM
MARYSVILLE, Washington - Police have not publicly released the name of the first female student killed, however, her friends have identified her as Zoe Galasso.

Teenager Zoe Galasso killed in Friday’s shooting rampage at a Washington State high school was remembered Sunday by her peers.

Zoe Galasso was eating lunch in the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School when she was shot and killed by 14-year-old Jaylen Fryberg, who wounded four other people before killing himself.

14-year-old Gia Soriano, who had been in critical condition after the gunfire, died late Sunday.

Galasso was dating Fryberg’s cousin, 15-year-old Andrew Fryberg, who had also been critically injured in the

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Saturday October 25, 2014    12:40 PM
MARYSVILLE, Washington - Update: Shaylee Chuckulnaskit has died of her injuries.

Three of the students injured Friday during a deadly school shooting north of Seattle were in critical condition Saturday, with a fourth in serious condition, hospital officials said.

Shaylee Chuckulnaskit and Gia Soriano, both 14, suffered critical head wounds when Fryberg opened fire in the school cafeteria with a .40 caliber handgun. Fryberg also killed a female student at the scene, but police have not identified her.

UPDATE: First Female Victim Identified as 14-year-old Zoe Galasso.


Two male victims, Nate Hatch, 14, and Andr

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Friday October 24, 2014    05:35 PM
A high school homecoming prince in Washington state calmly opened fire in the school cafeteria at lunchtime, killing one person and injuring at least four others before shooting himself to death, police and witnesses said.

Eyewitnesses and law enforcement sources identified the shooter as Jaylen Fryberg, a freshman at Marysville Pilchuck High School. Marysville Police Commander Robb Lamoureux earlier declined to publicly identify the sole suspect, only saying he was a male student at the school, about 40 miles north of Seattle.

Fryberg was on the football team and a video from this year's homecoming game showed him named the freshman class homecoming prince.

What We Know About the W

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Friday October 24, 2014    04:29 PM
Long before Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, consideration had been given to developing the economy along the Columbia River by building dams for flood control, irrigation, navigation, and power generation. In 1929, the Army Corps of Engineers prepared a report that recommended 10 dams along the river. No action was taken, however, until the Roosevelt administration.

In 1934, two huge projects were started: Grand Coulee Dam in north central Washington State and Bonneville Dam, which would span the river between Washington and Oregon at a spot 80 miles upstream from Portland. Construction of the Bonneville Dam began in June 1934, and took three years. The construction drew 3,000 workers, man

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Friday October 24, 2014    04:14 PM
Although there is considerable evidence that Paleo-Indians lived in the Pacific Northwest 15,000 years ago, the first record of human activity within the boundaries of present-day Oregon came from archaeologist Luther Cressman's 1938 discovery of sage bark sandals near Fort Rock Cave that places human habitation in Oregon as early as 13,200 years ago. Cressman found more evidence of early human activity at Paisley Caves, north of Paisley, Oregon, caves where researchers affiliated with the University of Oregon have conducted new excavations during the 21st century.By 8000 B.C. there were settlements across the state, with the majority concentrated along the lower Columbia River, in the weste

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Thursday October 23, 2014    05:25 PM
WALLOWA COUNTY, Oregon - It was 1881 and the Townfolk thought the man by the name of John Hawk was stealing cattle. Seems he refused to talk about it much so one night, a group of cattlemen slithered into his camp and killed him.

Nearly everyone agreed that John Hawk was the meanest, most unpleasant man they’d ever met.

That, as much as anything else, was why he was about to die, on a cold, clear, moonlit night by the Lostine River in 1881.

Hawk was 31 years old at the time, a native Oregonian born in 1850. He’d boldly gone deep into Nez Perce tribal lands and staked a claim, rather a dangerous thing to do in the days of Chief Joseph, and started ranching on Prairie Creek, three mil

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Thursday October 23, 2014    08:32 AM
Women who'd married German men suddenly learned they'd been legally (and very unconstitutionally) made stateless, and were forced to register as "enemy aliens"; those who'd married Chinese men fared even worse.

Nobody remembers it today, because it was so long ago. But the outbreak of the First World War changed Oregon – and the rest of the United States – a great deal.

News of America’s entry into the fight was greeted with excitement, eagerness and dread. But there was one particular group of Oregonians for whom the dread was particularly pronounced: The German-American community.

The German-born cohort of Oregon residents was bigger than any other foreign-born group, totaling 18,

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Monday October 20, 2014    09:32 AM
King O the cockatoo's bald little head hints at how stressful his life used to be.

"He was very attached to his first person, and from all accounts he had a wonderful life with her. When she died, he grieved for her," says Jacqueline Johnson, who runs the bird department at Best Friends Animal Society. "His next home was with a family member who had no idea how to help him cope with his loss and grief. That is when he started pulling out his feathers with his feet."

The new owner reached out to Best Friends to see if the bird might be happier living at the group's massive sanctuary in the red hills of southern Utah, which is home to some 100 birds and 1,600 other animals, including dog

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Tuesday October 14, 2014    09:43 AM
Some guardian angels choose to look over us from close by.

And such help from two loving golden retrievers might be the reason Judy Muhe of Palmdale, Florida, is still alive today. When the 76-year-old woman, who suffers from Parkinson's disease and lives alone, fell in her kitchen, 10-year-old Higgins and 4-year-old Dodger clung to her side for two days until help arrived, reported ABC News.

Muhe bruised her head and shattered her shoulder when she fell, and spend the subsequent 48 hours drifting in and out of consciousness. Her two dogs, aware of her distress, laid down next to her, keeping her as warm and as comfortable as they possibly could.

"The main thing was they let me know

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Tuesday October 14, 2014    09:39 AM
David Cohen understands that mosquitoes aren't just pesky annoyances -- they're global killers, too.

That's why the 12-year-old from Dallas invented a robot that drowns the pests using a pump-jet system that traps them underwater using mesh. He submitted his work to the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge earlier this year and is one of the competition's ten finalists.

The challenge, which is open for students who are in grades 5 through 8 at the time of submission, awards its winner $25,000, the title of "America's Top Young Scientist," and an all-expenses paid vacation. A victor will be decided after finalists present their work on Oct. 13 and 14 in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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